From www.kimandrewelliott.com

State-funded media (including international broadcasting) is not always "inherently political"

Posted: 22 Jul 2018

“State-funded media is inherently political …"https://t.co/w5FdAOyq2y

— Kim Andrew Elliott (kaedotcom) <a href="https://twitter.com/kaedotcom/status/1021169549234798593?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 22, 2018</a></blockquote> <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-conversation="none" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Kim (1/6):<br>In most cases, national governments fund media outlets to use them as a way to promote policies under the guise of and ersatz news service. Chinese state media are an example.</p>&mdash; Kim Andrew Elliott (kaedotcom) July 22, 2018


Kim (2/6):
But in some cases, national governments fund media outlets to provide a needed news service where it is needed. In such cases the (uncommonly wise) government provides the money but allows the media outlet the independence to carry out its journalistic mission.

— Kim Andrew Elliott (kaedotcom) <a href="https://twitter.com/kaedotcom/status/1021169551420149761?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 22, 2018</a></blockquote> <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-conversation="none" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Kim (3/6):<br>In most languages, international broadcasting has little or no commercial potential. A national government must step in to provide the money. But the government must also guarantee independence, so that the outlet can achieve credibility.</p>&mdash; Kim Andrew Elliott (kaedotcom) July 22, 2018


Kim (4/6):
Credibility is necessary to attract an audience. Audiences abroad are seeking a reliable alternative to state-controlled domestic media. BBC World Service is the archetypal example. Deutsche Welle is another.

— Kim Andrew Elliott (kaedotcom) <a href="https://twitter.com/kaedotcom/status/1021169553236164608?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 22, 2018</a></blockquote> <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-conversation="none" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Kim (5/6):<br>The entities of US international broadcasting (VOA, RFE/RL, RFA, the Martís, Alhurra/Sawa) have enjoyed independence since 1994 under the bipartisan Broadcasting Board of Governors, whose members serve fixed and staggered terms.</p>&mdash; Kim Andrew Elliott (kaedotcom) July 22, 2018


Kim (6/6):
That will end later in 2018, when a politically appointed CEO takes over US international broadcasting. He or she, and not the board, will appoint the heads of the entities. That process will be political, too. Prospects are not good for US international broadcasting.

— Kim Andrew Elliott (@kaedotcom) July 22, 2018

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